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Posted by on Jun 30, 2015 in Uncategorized |

Packing Materials Best Suited For Fragile Items

When moving, you know how easily fragile items will break if not packed properly. What you may not know is which supplies are best suited for securing your breakable items. For this reason, you want to gather information about the packing supplies moving companies use so that you know what materials are best for your particular job.

Paper Types

Most fragile items need to be wrapped in some type of paper. When you pack your own belongings, it is tempting to use newspaper because it is easy to find and you can stockpile it when you know a move is coming. However, for many fragile items, the ink used on newspapers can damage your belongings.

To reduce damage, many moving companies use nonreactive paper made from recycled materials. What makes this paper different is that it does not contain any dyes, inks or acids that could damage paintings or fine china. Some companies refer to this paper as “bleached” packing paper and it comes in large thin sheets.

Another option is corrugated paper, which has the same interior look as cardboard boxes. The difference is that this paper is thinner and flexible, which allows the packers to wrap items securely inside of boxes. Generally, it comes in rolls. Moving companies use this paper to cushion larger items like oil paintings so that they’re not damaged while being moved.

Bubble Wrap

Bubble wrap is another packing material that comes in several sizes. The smaller bubble wraps are better suited for fine china or other small decorative pieces. Many packers prefer to use this material along with packing paper, to help cushion items and to prevent shifting while your items are in boxes.

The larger bubble wraps are usually used for sturdier items like TVs and computers. The size of bubbles acts as pillows and absorbs any movement. For items that need to go into crates, the packers may use a layer of bubble wrap in tandem with moving blankets to offer the highest level of protection for your breakable items.

Bubble wrap also works well for added padding inside of the boxes to fill gaps. The fewer the gaps inside of a box, the less likely something will break, should the box get knocked into something like the side of the moving truck.

Each company has their own methods for packing boxes, which is why you need to ask questions about the type of materials they use for fragile items. By taking some time to learn about the different packing materials, you can make sure the company that you choose will be able to prevent your fragile items from breaking. One company that might be able to help you is Midway Moving & Storage.

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Posted by on Jun 12, 2015 in Uncategorized |

When Is It Absolutely Necessary To Change Your Locks?

Is it time to change your locks? The signs are there if you pay attention. A well-made lock can last for a long, long time. A cheap lock will last you a long time too as long nobody tries to test it. Both of these types of locks will require a replacement at some point. Here’s how you can tell if it’s time.

Look to See if the Lock is in Disrepair

A lock that needs replacement will let you know. Look at yours.

  • Does it just look worn out?
  • Is there rust creeping around the edges of it?
  • Is it absurdly dull and tarnished looking?
  • Does it resist when you use the key?

These are all signs of a worn lock. If you notice any of these things, then you need to replace the lock. Once a lock reaches this point, its integrity is completely compromised. A rusty, worn lock doesn’t require any real effort for someone to break. This goes for deadbolts as well as spring bolts in doorknobs.  

There are many more reasons you may want to change out a lock or multiple locks in your home or business. Just make sure that you don’t swap the locks when a far cheaper, and quicker, rekeying will do.

For example, if you lose a key or somebody moves out, you don’t have to change all the locks unless you specifically want to. You can rekey the cylinders and keep your functional locks.

Reasons Beyond Disrepair

Reasons beyond disrepair, when it’s essential that you replace the lock, usually have to do with damage.

Break-ins – Even if a break in doesn’t succeed, you may need to change the lock. Brute force and tampering can weaken the lock or cause it not to work as it should. Even if it looks fine and works fine, you should consider replacing it. If you’re unsure, you can remove it and bring to a locksmith to see if it’s still okay to use.

Accidents – Much like an attempted or successful break-in, accidents are a good reason to change out a lock. If somebody accidentally barrels into the door, or a small vehicle hits it, then it’s no different from someone applying brute force on purpose.

Reasons Unassociated with Disrepair

Reasons that have nothing to do with damage, wear, or tear often have to do with aesthetics and security.

Aesthetics – You may want to upgrade your locks to match the overall look and feel of your house. This is especially nice after a renovation. Nice locks can improve the value of your home just a bit as well, simply by looking good and functional.

Security upgrades – There is a whole world of locks, locking mechanisms, and modern locking technology that can go right on your door. You may want to upgrade from the locks you have to something a little more robust and secure.

If you have cheap locks, then upgrading is a good option. But even if you have good locks, you may want to take it step further to something like a keyless entry lock. Yes, there are consumer-grade door locks that can read cards, fingerprints, or a sequence on a keypad.

The Bottom Line on Changing Your Locks

The bottom line is you either replace your locks because they need it, or because you want to. If it’s just one lock, you can get away with doing it yourself. If you’re trying to change all the locks in your home, you should speak to a professional locksmith.

There are many options when it comes to keying a whole home, and you may want to hear what they are from someone who knows what they’re talking about.

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